Kentucky Labor Institute
  • << October 2017 >>
    S M T W T F S
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7
    8 9 10 11 12 13 14
    15 16 17 18 19 20 21
    22 23 24 25 26 27 28
    29 30 31
      UnionActive Newswire  
     
    Join the Newswire!
    Updated: Oct. 17 (22:03)

    Turkey Trot 2017
    IBEW Local 332
    Local 570 Executive Board Re-elected
    Teamsters local 570
    The Best Protectors for Workers Are Other Workers
    Teamsters local 570
    Passing of one of our guys
    GCC/IBT District Council 4
    The Best Protectors for Workers Are Other Workers
    Teamsters Local 355
    The Best Protectors for Workers Are Other Workers
    Teamsters Local 355
     
         
    Important Links
    KY AFL-CIO Web Site
    Louisville Central Labor Council
    Louisville Central Labor Council
    Action Center
    Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
    Did you know...that the Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, first printed in 1903, is the oldest peer-reviewed publication dedicated to Kentucky history?Subscribe to the Register (only $40 per year).
    Action Center
    Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
    Did you know...that the Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, first printed in 1903, is the oldest peer-reviewed publication dedicated to Kentucky history?Subscribe to the Register (only $40 per year).
  • But I Can't Afford a Burger AND Fries and a Drink
    Posted On: Jan 18, 2016

    But, I Can't Afford a Burger, Fries And a Drink - Will the Minimum Wage Bankrupt Corporations?

                                                                joe brennan

                It is said that Henry Ford believed in giving his line workers enough in salaries so that they could afford to buy one of his cars. While there is a great difference between a car and a burger, a recent op-ed in the Wall Street Journal did not accept Ford's basic premise. This was but another article by a wealthy entrepreneur suggesting that an increase in the minimum wage could possibly bankrupt his enterprises, and yes, even Wal-Mart!

                Incredible as it might seem, the article compared the corporate profit per employee of a fast food chain with that of all Apple employees. What was not mentioned was that Apple makes such a tremendous profit due to its continued use of cheap Chinese labor. There, workers receive merely dollars per day. No wonder there are safety nets at the foot of their housing complexes to reduce employee suicides. If retaining the profit margin is your priority, the cost of a few safety nets is just another operational cost. Hopefully, the subscribers of the WSJ can see this comparison as absurd, but obviously the editorial staff does not.

                The article's op-ed also forgets to mention that one of his specialty burgers costs more than six dollars, and that's without fries and a drink. One of his employees would have to work two hours of their six hour shift just to have lunch at his restaurant. He does believe in basic corporate greed philosophy that "Highly compensated employers" (like himself) contribute more to a company's success than minimum wage employees, who are often "less experienced and entry-level workers". This coming from an individual who sold the rights to his enterprise for nearly $700 million dollars, and currently is the CEO of a corporation with some 3,450 eateries in this country alone. When was the last time he flipped a burger? Perhaps, it is time that he spent a week working undercover in one of his restaurants?

                What is so distasteful about his presentation is that it reflects his distain of those who daily make his wealth possible. A business that started as a hot dog stand has become so distanced from the plight of its own employees who cannot even afford the product they produce. There is no doubt that neither he nor the Waltons will find themselves on a food bank line, but can the same be said of his employees? All this seriously reflects on our character as a nation. This is not simply a question of economics, rather it is a growing attitude that this nation, that has given birth to an entrepreneurial spirit, has also created a spirit of demeaning those struggling to simply survive. As the Pharisee in the temple once said, " Thank you God that I am not like the rest of men", certainly not like that unskilled hamburger flipper.

                If this is what it means to be successful in the United States? Then, while certain citizens   we may be prosperous, we as a nation are a disgrace.    


  • Kentucky Labor Institute

    Copyright © 2017.
    All Rights Reserved.

    Powered By UnionActive


  • Top of Page image