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    Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
    Did you know...that the Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, first printed in 1903, is the oldest peer-reviewed publication dedicated to Kentucky history?Subscribe to the Register (only $40 per year).
    Action Center
    Register of the Kentucky Historical Society
    Did you know...that the Register of the Kentucky Historical Society, first printed in 1903, is the oldest peer-reviewed publication dedicated to Kentucky history?Subscribe to the Register (only $40 per year).
  • The Defects of Corporate-chartered On Line schools
    Posted On: Jun 01, 2016

    Corporate-chartered ONLINE SCHOOLS: An Example of a Total Failure

                edited by joe brennan kentuckylaborinstitute.unionactive.com

                Corporate-chartered schools can be bad,  "educational" online systems can be worse. And Yes, they are funded by our Tax Funds. Online Corporate-chartered schools propose to teach students via the internet. This eliminates the need for burdensome teacher-student ratios, classroom structures, dining facilities, correcting undisciplined students - even bathrooms present no problems. The corporation takes care of everything - especially the finances. Take for example what happened in Columbus, Ohio.

                Today's edition of the Times Digest gives one example of just how dysfunctional things can be. I will quote directly from the article. "The Electronic Classrooms of Tomorrow" (ECT) graduated 2,371 students last spring, the largest graduating class in the nation. BUT more students drop out of ECT than any high school in the nation. Even as the national on time graduation rate has hit a record high of 82 %. In 2014, the ECT school's graduation rate did not even reach 39%".

                "Virtual schools have experienced explosive growth nationwide financed mostly by state money. Electronic Classrooms has richly rewarded private companies affiliated with its founder Al Lager, a software executive. A portion of state money allocated for each student is redirected from traditional school districts to the cyber schools. The money has been used to enrich companies that Lager leads. According to federal tax filings, the school paid the companies associated with Lager nearly $23 million, or about one-fifth of the nearly $115 million it took in. He's becoming incredibly wealthy doing a very mediocre job for kids".

                What has happened in Ohio could also happen in Kentucky. "What better way to save money than to eliminate public schools for online Corporate-chartered schools"??? Talk about a blank check. I know physically challenged students have benefitted from internet schooling, but this is not what we have here. This is but another example of how to make money off of the tax payers under the excuse that a private online school system is both more efficient and economical. Homes without computers need not apply. 


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